Posts Tagged 'athletes'

A Disability, Perhaps an Opportunity in Disguise

A Disability, Perhaps an Opportunity in Disguise Tagged with:

When you were a child, didn’t you grow up wishing you could “be somebody?” Somebody that people would recognize, look up to, admire, almost idolize. Ever since I was a small child I desperately wanted to be something great, probably as most children do. Maybe go to the moon, run for president, play professional sports, become an award winning singer or actor, anything!! Every child’s dream is to be: GREAT.

Posted by Jess Jul 20, 2011 Posted in Disability No Comments

Coaching a reluctant participant in sports

Tagged with:

Recently, my young son expressed an interest in participating in a highly competitive track meet. The best students from across the city were going to gather  for a big event and close to one thousand runners would fill the stadium with noise and frenetic energy. Although Michael has autism he is a very capable young athlete who has enjoyed success against his peers. We both agreed he was ready for the challenge. As the track meet approached I noticed that he was becoming increasingly anxious. Soon, with any mention of the track meet, his tears would start to flow. No amount of calming or reassuring words could alleviate his anxiety.  He decided not to participate – this was something that I fully supported – and Michael’s sense of relief was almost palpable. I could not easily explain his change of heart. After a few days of gentle questioning I discovered that Michael was anxious about the length of the university track (400m) and his belief that it was much bigger than the track we practice on (also 400m). He had allowed this belief to undermine his confidence.

Posted by guest Jul 11, 2011 Posted in Uncategorized 2 Comments

Why relationships are important to athletes with challenges (part 2)

Tagged with:

A few weeks ago I wrote a blog titled “Teaching sports to special needs athletes: A tripod of influences”. In that blog I discussed how pedagogy (how you teach), content (what you teach) and relationships all contribute to the effectiveness of the athlete’s participation and enjoyment of sports. Positive athlete –coach relationships are particularly  important for special needs athletes. Coaches are in a powerful position to role model, mentor and advocate for athletes for whom the social aspects of sports present challenges. Research has shown that peer culture (especially in sports), when role modeled by a coach that values diversity, can support effective and authentic inclusion. The consequence is that athletes with challenges feel valued and accepted by teammates. Sadly, this is not the universal experience of some special needs athletes. Some of these athletes participate in “a culture of exclusion which posits that isolating and marginalizing someone is appropriate, acceptable and sometimes even laudatory” (Sapon-Shevin, 2003).

Posted by guest Jun 27, 2011 Posted in Uncategorized 1 Comment

The Power of Teamwork: Part 2

The Power of Teamwork: Part 2 Tagged with:

As I sit here, on a fairly monochrome twin bed somewhere in the right kidney of the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, I can take a breath of knowledge and feel that my concept of teamwork is being transformed, much in the way that I anticipated.

Posted by Ryan McLean Jun 27, 2011 Posted in Disability No Comments

Why relationships are important to athletes with challenges (Part 1)

Tagged with:

The exponential growth of Facebook, and other forms of social media, have powerfully demonstrated the importance we human beings place on feeling connected to others. Successful participation in this interconnected world now requires us to be capable of swift and articulate interactions with others. The rewards for competent practitioners of these social skills are considerable: They can influence social status and elevate the individual’s sense of well-being.

Posted by guest Jun 08, 2011 Posted in Uncategorized No Comments

The Up & Down Emotions of a Diagnosis Part V: Lesson Learned

The Up & Down Emotions of a Diagnosis Part V: Lesson Learned Tagged with:

Did I make the right decision by not going to the camp?

Posted by Jess May 27, 2011 Posted in Disability No Comments

One Legged Wrestler Never to Give Up

One Legged Wrestler Never to Give Up Tagged with:

Anthony Robles from Mesa, Arizona was born with no right leg. He was given a prosthetic leg and at the age of 3 he removed the prosthetic leg and has never put one back on. When he was 12, he set a record at his local elementary school for the most push-ups completed by any member of the school. “I really don’t see missing my leg as a handicap. My parents raised me strong and they didn’t give me any special treatment.” He worked very hard to do different exercises to keep his body strong.

Posted by Jess May 04, 2011 Posted in Uncategorized 1 Comment

Coaching beyond the cliches of sports

Tagged with:

Sports language is full of clichés. Too often we hear that an athlete has given 110 % in a game – as if effort is something that is easily measured and converted into a percentage. 

Posted by guest Mar 28, 2011 Posted in Uncategorized No Comments

The challenge is always there. It’s up to you if you want to tackle it!

The challenge is always there. It’s up to you if you want to tackle it! Tagged with:

It’s common; way too common. You ask someone to do something or you ask them why they didn’t do something & you constantly hear excuse after excuse for a person not being able to do something or even trying.

Posted by Jess Mar 23, 2011 Posted in Uncategorized No Comments

Weighing in on Inclusive vs. Disability-Specific Sport Settings

Weighing in on Inclusive vs. Disability-Specific Sport Settings Tagged with:

There is often a question of whether it is better to have sports specifically for people with disabilities or to include people with disabilities in sports with others who do not have disabilities.

Posted by Carolyn Mar 22, 2011 Posted in Uncategorized 2 Comments