How To Decrease Back Pain While Improving Your Backswing

Jan 14, 2014
Tagged with: How To Decrease Back Pain While Improving Your Backswing

 

If you’ve been playing golf  or adaptive golf long enough, you may have developed a slight twinge that pops up during your backswing. Just because you are experiencing back pain does not mean you have to give up your golf game. You can still play the game you love most and even improve your backswing with our top three stretching tips.

 

1. Stretching Before Beginning Each Golf Game

Any physiotherapist will support the idea of you practicing static, dynamic stretching before each round, according to the International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy. Warming up with stretches allows nutrients to flow to tissues such as tendons and ligaments to prevent strains that are associated with activities such as golf.

When beginning a new exercise stretching routine, it’s always best to know you’re engaging in the correct form. Golfers are familiar with how important correct form is. Practicing the correct form will prevent further injury while working toward improving your backswing. Laser Spine Institute offers a variety of instructional spine exercise and stretching videos that were developed with a therapeutic goal in mind. You can discover stretches that will help with your golf game. If you’ve just had surgery, you can also find rehabilitative stretches that will help get you back on the golf course fast.

For stretches to be therapeutically effective they should be:

  • Hold for 15 to 30 seconds and repeated 2 to 4 times
  • Performed 3 to 4 times during the week and before activity

 

golfswi2. Maintaining Posture During the Backswing

Want to prevent and decrease back pain during your golf game? Start off by practicing proper posture each time. One of the most common swing issues that affects many amateur golfers and some professional golfers is a misalignment or loss in posture somewhere throughout their swing, more often than not on the backswing. Why does this occur? Most commonly weakness occurring in the core or hips is what prevents you from being able to swing inline and often results in back pain.

Try the following stretches to secure your posture by improving core strength in the hips.

  1. Knee bend bridge:
  • ​Lay on your back with knees bent and feet on the floor.
  • Next raise hands above your face extended upward with palms together and fingertips touching.
  • Now raise one leg straight up with foot extended upward toward ceiling. Leg should be inline with other leg.
  • Lift buttocks off floor and hold for 10 seconds before alternating sides. ​

2. Knee up twist:

  • Stand in front of a chair.
  • Place trail leg on chair.
  • Turn into your backswing.

Golf Digest offers excellent visual examples of poor and perfect posture so that you can continually work on yours. Remember, if you can only handle a few holes at a time that’s better than suffering from an injury and not being able to play at all.

 

3. Yoga or Pilates0954-SgtRoyMitchellFirstSwing.jpg

Both of these activities focus on building core strength and flexibility. While golf may seem like a low-impact sport, without stability of the core, back pain is more liable to set in. Yoga For Golfers is an excellent resource to watch online videos that can help improve your backswing and help protect you from developing back injuries.

Checkout these links for Yoga:

http://www.ncpad.org/295/1834/Yoga~for~Individuals~with~Disabilities

 

 

 

 

Author: Gizelle Lachey



  • bobl07

    So what is your favorite sport? Do you engage in any warm up prior to participating? Why or Why not?

  • glachey

    hi bobl07, my favorite sport is cheer, if you want to say it’s a sport because many people don’t. It’s definitely a tough sport and I always needed to engage in warm up because you are emoving constantly and using your muscles. It was always important because you could easily pull a muscle or break a bone.

  • Bob Lujano

    I am thinking your talking about cheerleading! Am I right? If yes, then I agree with you 100%. Cheerleading is one of the most dangerous sports around. Every year it is close to the top of having the most accidents by it’s participants. So, I agree that a person has to be tough to participate. No doubt, that warming up is very important for this and any activity.