Amputee Baseball Player

Feb 24, 2011
Tagged with:

Baseball is one of America’s favorite past time. Many little boys dream about becoming baseball players when they grow up. For Anthony Burruto who has no legs, he is no different. He‘s been playing baseball with his prosthetic legs ever since he was 8 years old.

Anthony had both of his legs amputated when he was an infant.  He was born without a shinbone in his left leg and without a fibula in his right leg. For Anthony, this never deterred him from playing baseball.

Since Anthony has been playing the game for such a long time, his parents were not too worried about their son trying out for the varsity team at Dr. Phillips High School in Orlando this year and making the team. Unfortunately, Anthony did not make the cut. And for this reason, he and his parents, as well as other supporters believe Anthony was cut because of his disability.

However, Coach Mike Bradley disagrees. He explains that he cut Burruto during the second day of tryouts, concerned that he couldn’t field bunts. Also, thinks that opposing teams might take advantage of Burruto’s inability to jump off the mound quickly. And even the school’s Principal Gene Trochinski stands by his coach.

Principle Trochinski explains, “he was given the same opportunity as everyone else.”

So, the debate is whether Anthony whose disability in the past was never a problem for his Little League or high school fall ball teams was discriminated against. He can throw a fastball at 80 mph and reportedly has an evil curve. Also, has even been on the cover of ESPN magazine.

Anthony, his family and friends are very upset by this situation and feel this to be unfair. All they want is for the coach to view him as athlete not the disability.  “He’s not looking at him like he’s an athlete; he was looking at him like he’s a disabled person.” – Diane Burruto

My Opinion:
Honestly, I don’t know if Anthony Burruto was discriminated against because of his disability. In any situation such as this, you hope that people are fair, open-minded and impartial. But sometimes people are not, especially when it comes to disability. In this situation, Anthony’s past baseball teams did not question his ability to play baseball or his skill level. So, why wouldn’t he have made it to the varsity team? On the other hand, maybe simply he wasn’t good enough. The higher the level you get the harder and more competitive it gets. I hope that the coach made a fair decision. I can’t assume that Anthony was discriminated against just for the sake of this being on the subject of disability.

What do you think? It’s a tough call!

http://www.parentdish.com/2011/02/11/handicapped-athlete-supporters-protest-coachs-decision-to-cut/?icid=maing|main5|dl7|sec3_lnk3|43568

Author: Jenny Carlton



  • BobLujano

    The coach and the administrators made a decision based on performance. We can agree to disagree but we should also should respect that decision. If in fact it was his inability to field a bunt as the only reason for his dismissal, then I would take it upon myself as an athlete to find a way to field a bunt. I think Anthony can. Once he learns this then it should not be an issue when he tries out again.